Interview: Sexperts

I was interviewed about asexuality on Dr. Limor Blockman’s podcast Sexperts—which is a Playboy-affiliated podcast just so you know.

This is the direct link to the download of my interview.

My interview starts after a commercial at about 41:00—forty-one minutes in. I stress that anyone who for any reason does not want to listen to very explicit content should please make an effort to skip right to my interview, because the person who is interviewed right before me is discussing some kink situations (including BDSM, sadism specifically), and there’s a lot of sexually explicit detail. (If that’s your thing, listen to that too! 😉 )

If you’d rather listen in the browser and/or not download the content, I think you can get it here:

Sexperts Episode 32: Different Strokes

The interview with me is brief, but the interviewer knows how to ask open questions and didn’t confront me with any ignorance (though there were a couple phrases about “choice” that I think were not the best choice of words).

Interview: Pleasure Mechanics

Today I joined Chris of Pleasure Mechanics in discussing asexuality and my new book on the Speaking of Sex podcast. This was a really lovely interview; for once we got to discuss some pretty nuanced aspects of the orientation, some discussion beyond the basics, and a fair amount of practical application—what asexual people are learning from queer communities, and what everyone can learn from us.

Check out the interview here; it’s about 30 minutes long.

Interview: BBC Radio Berkshire

I was interviewed by Andrew Peach on the subject of asexuality in general. (I’m referred to as an author but my book isn’t really mentioned, sadly.)

The interviewer did ask a lot of leading questions (like “do you feel like you’re missing out on a part of the human experience that’s supposed to be there?”), but he was basically respectful when I gave straightforward answers. It wasn’t a bad interview, though I think the Skype recording caused a couple glitches.

Update:

Sadly the recordings expire after seven days, so there is no way to listen to this now.

Featured and Quoted: The New York Times

In Op-Talk, a feature of NYT Opinion, an article about asexuality heavily featuring quotes from me and my book has appeared!

Why Asexuals Don’t Want to Be Invisible Anymore

It’s a lovely little piece without the usual naysaying that so many journalists feel is necessary for “balance,” and there are several other asexual voices mixed in so it isn’t entirely a piece about me or my book. I’m quite pleased with it. Please read!

Interview: Salon, “You’re about as sexually attractive to me as a turtle”

An interview with me in Salon was posted today in Q&A format. It was an excellent chance to discuss some of the political aims of the asexual community (which we almost never get to talk about!), as well as my own experience discovering asexuality for myself and the best and worst things about it.

Read the article in Salon now!

For me, the worst thing about being asexual is other people trying to fix me all the time. They develop this completely inappropriate obsession with my sexual and romantic life, which can manifest as anything from aggressively propositioning me for sex to searching for what’s “really” wrong with me through invasive questions. Some of them maintain that these attempted interventions are about my health and happiness, apparently unaware that they’re compromising both by refusing to respect my identity.

Unfortunately the comments are full of invalidation, as they generally always are on articles about asexuality published in mainstream media. This one has everything from “this isn’t SCIENTIFIC” to “asexual people are heartless and cruel if they date anyone but other asexual people,” ignoring that actually people can agree to date on any grounds they like and nobody’s the arbiter of what amounts of sex must be promised before dating is fair.

I’ve also been assigned mental illness and misanthrope status, and it’s only been up for a couple hours as I post this! Doing great.

I think there’s a book some girl wrote that these people might benefit from reading. Don’t remember, though . . . what was it called?

Review (Library Journal): The Invisible Orientation

I got a starred review in Library Journal!

Decker, Julie Sondra.
The Invisible Orientation: An Introduction to Asexuality.
Carrel: Skyhorse. 2014. 240p. illus. notes. bibliog.
ISBN 9781631440021. $34.95;
ebk. ISBN 9781631440175. PSYCH

This is the first substantial book for the nonprofessional to emerge from the small but growing community of individuals who identify themselves as “asexual”—i.e., not sexually attracted to anyone; a portion of the population quoted as being approximately one in 100 people. Decker (contributor, Huffington Post; Salon), who writes in the introduction about her own asexuality, emphasizes that this is an orientation that has to do with feelings, not actions. The author stresses fluidity and inclusiveness: asexuality may change over time; some asexual people enjoy romantic relationships while others have no interest; libido may be high or low; and some are happy in partnered relationships while others enjoy the single life. The language and concepts are clearly modeled on those of the LGBTQ community, with an emphasis on asexuality being a healthy orientation, rather than the result of a mental or physical illness. The final chapter addresses friends and family members of asexual people. ­

VERDICT

This title is an important resource for readers of any age who are struggling to understand their sexual orientation, or those who would like to better understand asexuality.—Mary Ann Hughes, Shelton, WA

I’ll link it to their site once it’s posted. This is great for me and my publisher!