After Dinner Conversation Podcast

After Dinner Conversation has discussed my short story “Everyone’s Gay in Space” on their podcast. They have promoted the story on Twitter and on their podcast page.

You can listen through one of the links on their post. It’s carried on these podcast providers. I personally like Stitcher.

To quote from their site:

STORY SUMMARY: Douglas Junior and his wife both have a rare, recessive, genetic disease. They donate their blood to a lab to help them find a cure. Through a medical mix-up, Douglas Junior’s DNA is used to create his clone. 20 years later he finds out about his clone and reaches out to meet him. Things don’t go exactly as planned as Douglas Junior is a blue-collar working man, while his clone is a top-of-the-class gay student who plans to join the space program.

DISCUSSION: Interesting story that mirror some of the research done with sexual orientation differences between identical twins, as well as nature vs. nurture. Creates a springboard for good discussions about what information we would want to know about our clone. For example, are there unexplored genetic aptitudes I missed out on? Douglas seems to be very picky about which science he believes in, and which he doesn’t believe in, as so much of it is tied up how he self identifies. His clone is rightly frustrated by all the questions and says what may often be on the mind of others gay individuals, “it’s not my job to teach everyone in the world ‘Gay 101’”.

Hear the discussion!

Published Short Story: “Everyone’s Gay in Space”

My short story “Everyone’s Gay in Space” sold to After Dinner Conversation. It’s in the November 2020 issue.

Reading this one isn’t free on the Internet but as of today it can be accessed through a monthly subscription or by purchasing the story individually.

Here’s my post about when I wrote the story if you want more info.

 

Japanese Edition: The Invisible Orientation

The Invisible Orientation is now available in a Japanese translation.

This is a translation of the original material and is still a Western conception of the culture and concepts of asexuality. Its content has not been localized.

But it is available in bookstores and through its Japanese Amazon page.

My sister, whose husband is from Japan and has relatives there, recently found the book in a bookstore and bought a copy. Here it is in the wild, with photos from her Instagram. 🙂

 

Article reprinted in anthology: Drunk Monkeys Volume 3

My short piece “Asexual, Aromantic, Partnerless, Childless – and Happy” which was originally published in Drunk Monkeys and run a second time in Everyday Feminism (as “Asexual, Aromantic, Partnerless, Child-Free… And (Yes!) Happy” is now available in the Drunk Monkeys anthology Drunk Monkeys Anthology Volume 3!

drunkmonkeys

It was put together by the publication’s editor and is sold through Amazon here if you’d like a copy.

 

Published Short Story: “On the Inside”

My short story “On the Inside” is now available in the fourth issue of James Gunn’s Ad Astra.

Read it here.

adastra

 

 

 

“On the Inside” is set in an alternate world in which the sexes of male and female are strictly separated in terms of their gender roles and elemental education. Protagonist Lihill was determined at birth to be a boy, but she knows in her heart she’s a girl, and her story is about trying to be seen, heard, and believed.

Published Paperback: The Invisible Orientation

The Invisible Orientation is now out in paperback.

You can get it at various sellers, some of which are listed on my Purchase Page!

The new edition has some updates, corrections, and a little bit of new content. It is not completely rewritten or revamped, but it is new and improved. (And comparatively inexpensive, wink wink.)

Published Short Story: “Her Mother’s Child”

“Her Mother’s Child” was published in Kaleidotrope today.

Read it here.

kaleidotropesummer2015Kaleidotrope publishes mostly speculative fiction and prefers unconventional stories. My story, published in their summer 2015 issue, features a coming-of-age tale in a gently magical secondary-world setting, featuring goddess spirituality, queer perspectives, and a protagonist with an unusual disability.

 

 

Accepted short story: “On the Inside”

I had actually shelved this story for a long time because I thought maybe it needed to be rewritten in a different way—either with a different point of view choice or even with the perspective of another character. I thought these things mostly based on the feedback of the first editor I sent it to, and I didn’t send it out for a couple years.

Then for some reason I revisited the story and decided it could use a cleanup but that I liked it mostly how it was. I sent it out a couple more times and it got accepted within a month. Huh.

On the Inside” will be published in the next issue of James Gunn’s Ad Astra, though I don’t know when that will be and haven’t done the paperwork yet.

I hope the readers like it. 🙂

Video: Not-So-Frequently Asked Submission Questions

In the same vein as my previous post about less frequently asked questions about querying, I’m now posting the follow-up: Not-So-Frequently Asked Questions about submission for agented authors.


In the video, I answer the following questions:

  • What if it doesn’t sell?
  • Should I research my editors? Should I interact with them?
  • How should I behave online while I’m on submission?
  • How is being on submission different from submitting to agents?
  • What if it DOES sell?
  • What information should the agent be sharing with me while I’m on submission?
  • What do I do to stay calm while I’m on submission?
  • Why does it take so long?
  • What’s the “Big Five”? What’s an imprint?
  • What should I do next if my book doesn’t sell?
  • What does it mean if an editor praises my book but still rejects it?
  • What if the publisher wants to change my title?
  • How do agents pitch books to publishers?
  • Everybody else is getting book deals and I’m not! Is it just never going to happen for me?
  • Can my agent dump me?
  • How important is luck?
  • What about direct submissions to publishers without an agent?
  • What can I expect in terms of an advance?
  • What’s the one piece of advice you would offer to someone who’s newly on submission?